Jean Baptiste Camille Corot, ‘Interrupted Reading’

2 Apr




















Précis #1:

Rosenburg, K. (1970) “Know What You See.” The Renaissance Society at the University of Chicago. Retrieved on April 2, 2010 from http://www.renaissancesociety.org/site/Exhibitions/Essay.Know-What-You-See.214.html

In this essay, Rosenberg suggests that how on sees a painting today, may not actually be the same way the artist saw the painting when he or she painted it. Rosenberg reviews how x-rays, radiographs, ultraviolet lights and raking lights help depict if a painting was altered, or if a painting has various layers to it that suggest that the artist painted many versions of it before the final presentation. Rosenberg talks about how radiographs and raking lights show that Corot’s ‘Interrupted Reading’ has a build-up of layers that indicate that Corot painted the arm three times before he was content with it’s position. ‘Know What You See’ contains history about works of art, and how technological mechanisms help see the process the artist took to create the painting, or to show if the painting was altered, therefore making this essay aimed toward an academic audience of art and technology.

Précis #2:

(2009, February) “Corot, Jean Baptiste Camille (1796-1875) – 1865-70 Interrupted Reading.” Flickr. Retrieved on April 2, 2010 from http://www.flickr.com/photos/32357038@N08/3258699139

In this essay, the author suggests that Corot’s work went through an evolution because Corot’s paintings show many styles. The author reviews periods that historians have divided Corot’s work into, and how his way of painting changed in each stage. The author focuses on Corot’s early, mature, and elderly stages in order to understand how his techniques and styles of painting changed throughout his life. Because this essay presents historic information about Corot’s work, this essay is aimed for an audience interested in Corot’s work and for admirers of art history.

Précis #3:

Johnson, B. “Jean Baptiste Camille Corot, French Barbizon School, 1786 – 1875.” Hoocher. Retrieved on April 2, 2010 from http://hoocher.com/Jean_Baptiste_Camille_Corot/Jean_Baptiste_Camille_Corot.htm

In this essay, the author argues that Corot was not only interested in architectural settings and landscapes, but that he was infatuated with expressing the beauty of the Italian woman and emotion of the French woman in his work. The author presents Corot quotes that show his passion for the Italian woman’s physical features. Because Corot is a well-known landscape artist, the author presents Corot’s paintings of women, some including Interrupted Reading, Italienerin mit Krug, and Italienne assise jouant de la Mandoline, in order to understand how his infatuations of those women were transmitted onto his work. This essay primarily contains information on the cultural influences of Corot’s paintings of women, therefore aiming an audience of people interested specifically in Corot’s work of female portraits, and people interested in how culture is portrayed in paintings.

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Tupac Shakur’s ‘Thug Life’ Tattoo

30 Mar

Tupac Shakur’s ‘Thug Life’ tattoo presents a statement that is much more than just being a tough person. According to the sources, ‘Thug Life’ is an acronym for, “The Hate U Give Little Infants Fucks Everyone.” Considering that this statement made absolutely no sense to me, I researched what the actual statement of ‘Thug Life’ meant for Tupac Shakur.

‘Thug Life’ represents the life of a person that struggled since birth, a person who continues to struggle, but overall, a person that works through those struggles to succeed in life. Urban Dictionary defines ‘thug life’ as “someone who had nothing, and was nothing, and became something.”

According to Urban Dictionary, it is essential for one to not confuse a thug with a ‘gangster’. A gangster is one who commits illegal acts, does not necessarily work hard for what he/she wants, and is also a “wannabe thug.”

However, I find this statement to be contradictory because when looking at Shakur’s lyrics of “Thug for Life,” he states that he is a thug because he worked out of poverty through illegal work; specifically, selling drugs. This act of illegal work is also seen in Shakur’s “Code of Thug Life.” Shakur established the “Code of Thug Life” at the ‘Truc Picnic’ (a friend/family gathering) in California. The code entails rules such as selling drugs and not obeying the police. However, there are positive rules that state that all should show respect, must stop rape and brutality to others, and stop the abuse of the elderly as well.

In all, I believe that Thug Life represents a life that shows success. However that success does not have to be achieved through legal means. Rather, it does not matter how one’s goals are achieved, just as long as one works hard for those ultimate goals. I also believe that one does not have to come out of poverty. Therefore if one’s goal is to go from a millionaire status to a billionaire status, and works hard for that goal, that also represents a life of a thug. Thus anyone can live a ‘Thug Life’ and be considered a thug.

Primary Source:

  • Tupac Shakur’s torso that displays the tattoo stating ‘Thug Life’



















Secondary Sources:

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