Project Proposal

23 Apr

My research topic focuses on the question, ‘what are the effects that undocumented students encounter in higher education?’ However, coming to this final issue took much longer than expected. I first considered subjects of interest and subjects that were simply relevant to my life. Consequently, I thought of how my family in Mexico has been affected by the violence caused by the cartel drug wars, yet not much information was found on that matter. After many attempts of composing a narrow topic/question, I arrived at the subject of undocumented immigrants. This subject is relevant to my life because both my sister and I were undocumented students for many years. Thus I decided to focus on undocumented students and education. From there, I narrowed that subject to the issue of, ‘what are the effects that undocumented students encounter in higher education?’ Accordingly, my hypothesis became: Undocumented students living in the United States encounter obstacles when trying to obtain a higher education because of the United States’ federal legislation concerning undocumented students, and undocumented immigrants in general.’

Becoming aware of the problematic issues undocumented students encounter is important because it allows people to better understand and help those immigrant students that want to attend college. Because this topic focuses on undocumented students, undocumented students trying to obtain a higher education are my target audience. Immigrants altogether may too be part of my audience because many undocumented immigrants have children facing the issue of higher education. I will also like to target politicians so they can become aware of how legislation effects those who are intellectual students, but who are unfortunately undocumented.

Précis #1:

Contreras, Frances. “Sin Papeles y Rompiendo Barreras: Latino Students and the Challenges of Persisting in College.” Harvard Educational Review 79.4 (2009): 610-631. Academic Search Premier. EBSCO. Web. 22 Apr. 2010.

In this journal, Frances Contreras argues that undocumented students are beating the odds just to obtain that prolonged dream of attaining a postsecondary degree. Contreras presents a case study made up of twenty detailed interviews with undocumented Latino students. Contreras goes more in-depth by reviewing the implementations of HB 1079 and the DREAM Act in order to make others aware of the challenges undocumented students face when trying to attend college. Because this journal presents personal insight of undocumented students and a review of federal law, this article is targeted to the immigrant population of America, as well as those in the academic and political fields that are trying to better understand the challenges undocumented students face regarding postsecondary education.

Précis #2:

Abrego, Leisy J. “I CAN’T GO TO COLLEGE BECAUSE I DON’T HAVE PAPERS’’: INCORPORATION PATTERNS OF LATINO UNDOCUMENTED YOUTH.” Palgrave Macmillan Journals 4 (2006): 212-31. Google Scholar. Web. 22 Apr. 2010.

In this journal, Lesley Abrego focuses on undocumented students trying to obtain a higher education, and the challenges that such an aspiration comes with. To do this, Abrego presents information on how undocumented immigrants assimilate to American culture, what federal laws restrict them from obtaining a higher education, and presents interviews with undocumented students, as well. Abrego puts the issue of undocumented students and education in social and psychological contexts in order to understand the issues that undocumented students encounter when trying to obtain a higher education, and the psychological issues, such as assimilation, prior to trying to obtain a higher education. This journal contains information on undocumented students psyche and social challenges that restrict them from going to college, thus this journal targets an academic audience trying to understand what psychological and social issues undocumented students face when trying to go to college.

Précis #3:

Kasarda, Ralph W. “AFFIRMATIVE ACTION GONE HAYWIRE: WHY STATE LAWS GRANTING COLLEGE TUITION PREFERENCES TO ILLEGAL ALIENS ARE PREEMPTED BY FEDERAL LAW.” Brigham Young University Education & Law Journal 2 (2009): 197-244. Academic Search Premier. EBSCO. Web. 22 Apr. 2010.

In this journal, Ralph W. Kasarda argues that federal law preempts allowing undocumented students to pay in-state tuition. Kasarda presents background information on undocumented immigrants that are granted in-state tuition, as well as past state propositions and federal court cases. Kasarda reviews the cases of Martinez v. Regents of University of California in order to prove that in-state tuition is an educational benefit because federal immigration laws deny it. Because this journal argues against allowing undocumented students to obtain a higher education, the target audience are politicians seeking to prevent undocumented students from achieving a higher education, as well an academic audience interested in federal legislation regarding immigrants, such as lawyers and policy makers.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: